Health Inspector Training Opens Door for Job Opportunities

Have you been considering pursuing a career in the health inspection industry? There are so many different job options in this field, including a health and safety specialist, an environmental health specialist, and so many more. The starting pay in this line of work is close to or slightly over $40,000, depending on the location and exact nature of the job. Perhaps the best thing about working in this field is job security. The job typically entails ensuring various organizations are up to par with compliance regulations on a local, state, or federal level, so as long as there are regulations, there is a need for inspectors. Before you can begin your career in this field, though, you will need to pursue health inspector training. Here is what you need to know:

Education
Not all jobs in the field require a specialized degree in hygiene, health physics or related fields like chemistry, engineering, and so forth. Some employers will certainly require degrees such as this, but if you are scanning the job opportunities online and come across this requirement for some jobs, do not be alarmed if you don’t have a degree in the right field. There are many job opportunities that will accept health inspector training and certifications in the field in lieu of a full degree.

Certification
Whether you have a degree in a related field or not, many jobs will want you to take specialized health inspector training and have a certification in hand. Many of these certification can be earned by taking online courses from various institutions and organizations, and a quick Internet search can yield some great course options. Some of the topics covered in such courses may include management of hazardous materials, risk communication, and more. Keep in mind that while it is not required to be certified in an area, most companies look favorably on candidates who have a full certification in this area. Certifications in this industry are most commonly obtained through the American Board of Hygiene, the Board of Certified Safety Professionals, and the American Board of Health Physicists. Continue reading “Health Inspector Training Opens Door for Job Opportunities”

Health and Safety Executive

The Health and Safety Executive, usually shortened to HSE in the “trade”, are the agency responsible for enforcing Health and Safety in the Workplace law in the UK. They also provide guidance on and promote awareness of these issues to the general public. Whilst it holds a key role in enforcing legislation, its mission is to also to help prevent people from being killed, injured or made ill whilst at work.

The Executive is directly responsible for legal compliance in higher risk locations e.g. oil rigs, mines, nuclear plants, factories, building sites and utilities as well as hospitals, schools and colleges and government locations.

In addition to the Executive, more than 400 local authorities are used to enforce Health and Safety law at a local level and are responsible for hotels, restaurants, pubs and clubs, shops, offices, nurseries and playgroups, sheltered accommodation, care homes, places of worship and privately owned museums. A number of other agencies deal with specific aspects of Health and Safety e.g. the Fire Service for fire related issues and Environmental Health for food hygiene and pollution.

The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 gives the Executive’s inspectors, including those working in local authorities, wide ranging powers. Whilst their focus aims to be preventative and provide assistance, an inspector may informally advise you of a minor breach and explain how you can comply with the law and why the action is necessary. Continue reading “Health and Safety Executive”

Common Health and Safety Hazards in Factories

Just like elsewhere in the western world, In the UK as well the government has prescribed some safety regulations that have to be adhered to by any workplace. Protection against health and safety hazards may even extend to the families of people employed in hazardous occupations. In the European Union, member countries have enforced authorities to ensure that the legal basics related to occupational health and safety hazards is followed in any case.

Hazard is something that can cause harm if not controlled. A risk is the probability of the outcome which will occur if harm occurs. The outcome can be defined as the result of an uncontrolled hazard. Risk analysis is conducted to identify hazards, evaluate the risk, and identify and prioritize the required actions.

Workplace safety hazards are normally grouped into environmental hazards, environmental agents, physical agents, physical hazards, chemical agents, and biological hazards. Environmental hazards normally include asphyxiation and dehydration. Environmental agents include heat and cold stress. Physical hazards include collision, tripping, falling, and electricity. Physical agents include noise, vibration, and lighting.

Other hazards are mechanical hazards, biological hazards, and chemical agents. Depending on the type of work that is done in a factory, safety precautions have to be employed. Office workers can be affected by a flu spread by a co-worker, and a factory worker can receive serious injury because of an accident. Common health and safety hazards can be avoided by taking necessary precautions. But, even with all necessary precautions accidents do occur.  Continue reading “Common Health and Safety Hazards in Factories”